Inhalation Cleansing and Relaxing Breath

This technique stimulates oxygen flow, which cleanses, clears, and soothes your mind and your body. It focuses on the breath that moves in your upper chest. This technique focuses on 3 breaths. Each breath is comprised of 1 – 8 inhalations and one exhalation.

Try it: Open and lower our eyes to soften your focus. Take in 1 to 8 short, staccato, breathes through your nose, filling your chest. Then gently exhale through your mouth. Perform three sets of 1-8 inhalations to 1 exhalation.

Notes: Try to keep your shoulders down. You might notice at the end that you feel lightheaded.

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Comments

Inhalation Cleansing and Relaxing Breath — 4 Comments

  1. Hello! I am a student in a Master’s program for SLP. I find it interesting that staccato inhalations are recommended in this technique and was wondering how that affects the mind/body differently than just one long, deep inhalation? I have never heard of a breathing technique that has the person inhale in this way and am curious! I agree, for sure, that reducing tension is winning half the battle for PWS. Thank you!

    • Hi Nicole,
      Deep breathing exercises sound like it may help reduce some of the stress and anxiety associated with a PWS.

      Do you think the technique you mentioned above ( Stacato breathing) plus a circumlaryngeal massage may be helpful when reducing the tension and anxiety associated with PWS? I would love to hear your take on this matter.

      Best,
      Kelly Olson

      • Hi, Nicole, Thank for taking the time to read ISAD.

        I am going to refer this question to Elizabeth Kapsten, one of the 3 writers of this paper. This is her area !

        For my part, I feel most body work is essential for PWS, and others recieving psychotherapy / speech therapy. In my practice I use somatic experiencing skills to help the PWS get connected with what’s happening with their body. I currently used a variety of breathing techniques for all my clients (just not PWS). I think finding what they respond to best has been most helfpul.

        Stay in touch with us. We are committed to have this convesation continue beyond ISAD.

        Contact me at NOConnorLCSW@gmail.com
        and stay in touch also through our website, http://www.stutteringmoment.com/

    • Thank for taking the time to read ISAD. Good questions. I am going to refer tis uestion to Elizabeth Kapsten, one of the 3 writers of this paper. For my part, I used a variety of breathing techniques for all my clients (just not PWS). I think finding what they respond to best as been most helfpul.

      Stay in touch with us
      http://www.stutteringmoment.com/