How Can An Audiologist Help A PWS?

Hello- 

I would like to know how as an audiologist, can we help those who stutter? Is there anything you would recommend and audiologist to do? Also, do people who stutter go to audiologist at some point in their therapy? 

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How Can An Audiologist Help A PWS? — 2 Comments

  1. Hi Karen
    I personally haven’t seen any PWS visit an audiologist as a part of their therapy for stuttering. Some who might stutter as well as clutter might need to rule out auditory processing difficulties, but that is very case specific.
    Other than that if a PWS visits your clinic for a hearing related issue, just follow the threads of discussion on this wonderful forum and be a patient and empathetic listener. In every other way a PWS is just like any other person who might seek your help!

  2. Karen,

    Hello, and thank you for asking a question to the professional forum. I completely agree with my colleague Dr. Kelkar in that an audiologist isn’t a part of the diagnostic process or therapeutic journey of someone who stutters specifically as you know, however, someone who stutters may have co-occuring diagnosis that may require the need for an audiologist. With that being said, there is so much that you can do to advocate about stuttering outside of your immediate scope of practice. 🙂 The Stuttering Foundation of America has some great free resources/tips that you can use to spread the word regarding communicating with people who stutter; here are a couple:

    Tips for speaking with someone who stutters:
    https://www.stutteringhelp.org/6-tips-speaking-someone-who-stutters-0

    Also, if you have any future patients that may have concern that their child could possible by stuttering:
    https://www.stutteringhelp.org/if-you-think-your-child-stuttering

    Given that as an audiologist you are perhaps involved in developmental hearing screenings, etc the above reference would be great for you to have, as so many parents think their child may be stuttering when it really is developmentally appropriate language development/disfluencies related to language development and not true stuttering.

    My last piece of advice/information for you involves support groups. If you have any patients that come to you who do stutter (children or adults) and they are not involved in a support group, if you are in the United States, you could possibly direct them to the closest chapter of the National Stuttering Association (NSA), the website for finding the support group closest to your area is:
    https://westutter.org/chapters/

    The NSA has chapters for families and adults.

    There is also the Stuttering Association for the Young (SAY) at:
    https://www.say.org/

    and the National Association of Young People who Stutter (FRIENDS) at:
    https://www.friendswhostutter.org/

    All of the above groups have a yearly conference, some groups have summer camps, and the Stuttering Foundation of America also has a generalized list of summer camps (some are now in operation since the pandemic with some given restrictions), so check out those resources to share with people you serve. 🙂
    I hope that this information helps you, and thank you SO MUCH for everything that you do, and for your interest and compassion in helping advocate for people who stutter.
    Thanks,
    Steff

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